Research Projects

Planning for Innovative and Emerging Mobility Futures at Intermodal Passenger Facilities

Assigned to Adam Cohen
Last Edited by Adam Cohen

The objective of this research is to identify strategies and best practices for the public sector to plan and integrate emerging transportation modes at intermodal passenger facilities (including airports, vertiports, rail and bus transit stations, mobility hubs, and water transit). A core goal of the research will be to identify best practices for short-, medium-, and long- range planning considerations. The goals of this research will be to understand:

• The role of stakeholders (public and private), partnerships, and governance structures that could support and enable planning for innovative and emerging mobility at intermodal facilities;

• The potential impacts of innovative and emerging mobility technologies (e.g., connected and automated vehicles, hyperloop, urban air mobility) on intermodal passenger facility operation, access, and design;

• A framework for decision-making and capital planning considerations to more intelligently plan and prepare for transportation innovations at intermodal passenger facilities, such as:

o Policy and design strategies for repurposing existing infrastructure; renovating and adapting facilities for changes in modal access; and replacing infrastructure to prepare for emerging transportation innovations;

o Cross-modal policies and strategies that can be applied to intermodal access in order to mitigate congestion, increase occupancy, shift spatial/temporal demand, more efficiently use resources, achieve infrastructure savings, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions;

o Practices for enhancing equity and accessibility of intermodal passenger facilities and first- and last- mile access for vulnerable populations and disadvantaged communities; and

o Potential long-range changes in how travelers connect to and use intermodal facilities due to potential long-term social impacts associated with concerns about public health and infectious disease.

• Opportunities and practices for scalable intermodal connectivity in small, medium, and large communities and intermodal facilities of a variety of sizes.

 

The expected final product will be a primer or guide for the public sector to integrate innovative and emerging transportation technologies at existing and planned intermodal passenger facilities. This resource will include tools and techniques that facilitate decision-making and the integration of emerging technologies by a range of stakeholders, and emerging practices for planning and implementation.

 

//PROJECT SUBMITTED TO ACRP, TCRP, AND NCHRP for Joint Funding//

Co-Sponsors:

AV050 - Standing Committee on Airport Terminals and Ground Access

AP045 - Standing Committee on Intermodal Passenger Facilities

AR010 - Standing Committee on Intercity Passenger Rail

AR010(1) - Subcommittee on Intercity Passenger Rail Intermodal interface

AP020 - Standing Committee on Emerging and Innovative Public Transport and Technologies

AP020(3) - Subcommittee on Equity of Innovative Mobility Services and Technologies

 

Other Supporters:

California, Michigan, Mississippi, New Mexico, and Washington Departments of Transportation

Former Secretary of Transportation Norman Mineta

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti

Los Angeles Metro, Office of Extraordinary Innovation (OEI)

Beverly Swaim-Staley, Union Station Redevelopment Corporation (formerly of Baltimore Airport)

Nuria Fernandez, Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority and American Public Transportation Association (formerly of Chicago O'Hare Airport)

Randell Iwasaki, Contra Costa Transportation Authority

Matthew Daus, International Association of Transportation Regulators

Background (Describe the current situation or problem in the industry, and how your idea would address it.)

In recent years, intermodal passenger facilities (including airports) have become increasingly complex multimodal facilities that can include any combination of public transportation, metro rail, commuter rail, shared mobility (e.g., transportation network companies), micromobility/active transportation (e.g., Capital Bike Share at Reagan National Airport) and aviation services. The introduction of innovative and emerging mobility technologies (e.g., advanced air mobility, shared automated vehicles, and automated transit) further adds to this complexity and has the potential to disrupt intermodal passenger facilities in a variety of ways (e.g., first- and last- mile connections, terminal/station access, and demand for connecting vehicular infrastructure, such as roadways and parking).

Airports, in particular, are increasingly becoming intermodal passenger hubs (e.g., Burbank Airport High Speed Rail Station and Orlando Airport Bright Line Station). While earlier ACRP research has attempted to look at the impacts of TNCs and changes in modal access impacting non-aeronautical revenue (ACRP 01-35 and 03-47, respectively), this research was not intermodal (focusing on airports) and did not include/emphasize innovative and emerging mobility technologies that could impact airports, such as automated and connected vehicles (AVs/CVs) and urban air mobility (e.g. air taxis). While past cooperative research program (CRP) studies have conducted tactical research on specific issues, there is a lack of strategic, multimodal research focused on developing best practices and considerations to prepare intermodal passenger facilities for changes in transportation, such as urban air mobility and automated vehicles. Preparing for these innovations requires intermodal collaboration, particularly as technologies, policies, and regulations develop simultaneously. More research is needed to support scenario planning and develop resources for public agencies to identify considerations and potential strategies to prepare for mobility innovation. This is critical to ensure that long-range plans are sufficiently forward-looking and capital projects under development today can more readily be repurposed or adapted in the future. This research can help airports (and other types of intermodal passenger facilities) maximize limited public sector resources by making these facilities "future ready" in preparation for anticipated transportation innovations.

Objective (What is the desired product or result that will help the airport industry?)

The objective of this research is to identify strategies and best practices for for the public sector to plan and integrate emerging transportation modes at intermodal passenger facilities (including rail and bus transit stations, mobility hubs, water transit, and airports). A core goal of the research will be to identify best practices for short-, medium-, and long- range planning considerations. The goals of this research will be to understand:
• The role of stakeholders (public and private), partnerships, and governance structures that could support and enable planning for innovative and emerging mobility at intermodal facilities;
• The potential impacts of innovative and emerging mobility technologies (e.g., connected and automated vehicles, hyperloop, urban air mobility) on intermodal passenger facility operation, access, and design;
• A framework for decision-making and capital planning considerations to more intelligently plan and prepare for transportation innovations at intermodal passenger facilities, such as:
o Policy and design strategies for repurposing existing infrastructure; renovating and adapting facilities for changes in modal access; and replacing infrastructure to prepare for emerging transportation innovations;
o Cross-modal policies and strategies that can be applied to intermodal access in order to mitigate congestion, increase occupancy, shift spatial/temporal demand, more efficiently use resources, achieve infrastructure savings, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions;
o Practices for enhancing equity and accessibility of intermodal passenger facilities and first- and last- mile access for vulnerable populations and disadvantaged communities; and
o Potential long-range changes in how travelers connect to and use intermodal facilities due to potential long-term social impacts associated with concerns about public health and infectious disease.
• Opportunities and practices for scalable intermodal connectivity in small, medium, and large communities and intermodal facilities of a variety of sizes.

Approach (Describe in general terms the steps you think are needed to achieve the objective.)

Potential research methods could include literature review, travel diaries, traveler interviews, surveys, expert interviews, workshops, simulations/modeling, in-depth case studies/examples (both domestic and international), and focus groups/peer exchanges of key stakeholders, such as technology providers, mobility service providers, and airport/transit/rail agency staff across North America that have experienced impacts from TNCs, micromobility/active transportation, shuttles/microtransit, and are actively planning for innovative and emerging modes of transportation. The expected final product will be a primer or guide for the public sector to integrate innovative and emerging transportation technologies at existing and planned intermodal passenger facilities. This resource will include tools and techniques that facilitate decision-making and the integration of emerging technologies by a range of stakeholders, and emerging practices for planning and implementation.

Cost Estimate and Backup (Provide a cost estimate and support for how you arrived at the estimate.)

450,000 (150,000 from ACRP only)

// PROJECT SUBMITTED TO ACRP, TCRP, AND NCHRP for Joint Funding // Funding from TCRP has been approved (Project #D-21). Funding from NCHRP has been requested (#2022-B-23).

Related Research - List related ACRP and other industry research; describe gaps (see link to Research Roadmaps above), and describe how your idea would address these gaps. This is a critical element of a synthesis topic submission.

Airports are increasingly becoming intermodal passenger hubs (e.g., Burbank Airport High Speed Rail Station and Orlando Airport Bright Line Station). While earlier ACRP research has attempted to look at the impacts of TNCs and changes in modal access impacting non-aeronautical revenue (ACRP 01-35 and 03-47, respectively), this research was not intermodal (focusing on airports) and did not include/emphasize innovative and emerging mobility technologies that could impact airports, such as automated and connected vehicles (AVs/CVs) and urban air mobility (UAM). This topic addresses both of these gaps by building upon this earlier work while simultaneously focusing on planning for emerging transportation technologies by drawing upon best practices from airports, rail stations, harbors, and other intermodal passenger facilities for long-range planning considerations for landside access.

https://apps.trb.org/cmsfeed/TRBNetProjectDisplay.asp?ProjectID=4415

https://apps.trb.org/cmsfeed/TRBNetProjectDisplay.asp?ProjectID=4426

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